LITTLE SLUGGER

Here is an article I wrote a while ago that I had actually forgotten about. Although it was initially panned by some critics and editors, I really thought the content was important. It was one of those epiphany moments that inspired this one. During a walk my mother and I went on we crossed the baseball diamond they use for little league in West Allis, the city I live in. It brought back memories of when I was a young lad and played little league myself. In reflecting on these times a change in perception and what is really important came to light.

I encourage you to click on the link below and visit the wonderful publication See Beyond that was gracious enough to publish this article and bring it to the masses. It can be found on page 48 of this month’s issue. I encourage you to check out the other articles in the magazine. They are full of insight and things that can enhance your life. If you want more on this subject, click over to my Neil Panosian YouTube channel and watch ’99 seconds with Neil episode 7 : What is really important’ I look forward to hearing what you think and your feedback.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE ARTICLE

WHAT IS REALLY IMPORTANT

I came across this sign on one of my daily walks. As I gazed across the baseball diamond behind the sign I saw children playing, laughing and having a good time.

This had me feeling reflective. I thought of my childhood days playing baseball. It started in T- ball where you hit a ball off of a stand. That was when I was very young. Then it went to pee-wee baseball, which is just as it sounds.

As I thought about these times the memories came flooding back. I could remember McKinley field the place we played. I remember the shirts we would get and how proud I was to wear it. I could even see the dusty field, feel the warm sun on my skin and taste the ice cream we had after games.

Do you know what I could not remember no matter how hard I tried? How many games we won or lost. I’m not sure whether they didn’t stress that for young children or if it just didn’t matter to me at that point in my life. The truth is probably somewhere in the middle.

It wasn’t until I’m thinking middle school that I remotely remember noticing and caring if I won or not. The ironic thing about that is my memories of that period are both up and down, depending on if I won or not. Whereas the memories of the early period when winning did not matter were all of the joy of merely playing.

That logic I can apply to my life now. If I have a book signing and nobody comes, if my seminar turnout is not what I hoped, I need to find the joy in the experience.

In your life, whether business, love or just life, search for the joy on being. Do not look for the win, look for the love.