WHICH WOULD YOU KEEP?

I have had countless conversations where people ask me which of the five senses I could most easily do without, but┬árecently I was asked the question, “Which sense do you think you would keep if you could only keep one?” Slightly different question, but changed the entire way I look at the situation. Instead of pondering what sense I valued the least, this made me consider which of the senses I valued the greatest. This caused me to ponder several things which could serve me well.

The first being which sense did I rely the most on. My first inclination was to say sight. After all being an writer it is rather an important one. Then I considered there have been blind writers in the past. Helen Keller not being the least of these. She not only did quite well, but brought very important messages to the world.

Secondly, as I continued to ponder which of my five senses was most important, I thought of things I teach in my book. The chapter ‘A Happy Playlist’ came to mind. In it’s simplest form it is about creating a playlist of songs that bring you joy. These can be accessed when life puts you in stressful or difficult situations. I thought of my love for music and the emotional power it can bring. There were also deaf musicians such as Beethoven, who did great things musically.

As I continued to go through my senses I thought of my beautiful Margie, the love of my life. I appreciate her beautiful face and can’t imagine not being able to stare lovingly at it. Her smile and goofy faces can transform the darkest of days for me. I thought of her angelic voice. Her singing is one of the reasons I fell in love with her. I couldn’t imagine not hearing her say I love you, which melts my heart each and every time. Not being able to feel her warm and reassuring hugs or smell her perfume as I hold her close or even the scent of her shampoo as I lay next to her on the pillow. Being able to enjoy the taste of the delicious dishes she creates is one of the many joys of being her man. Not to mention the taste of her lips in a kiss for dessert.

This was just one person, one example albeit the most important one, in my life. I was overcome with a feeling of gratitude and new-found appreciation for all of my senses and the fact that I did not face the daunting task of having to keep just one. I began to appreciate how much they work in unison and how dependent I am on all of them. Each one of them bringing me joy in an entirely different way.

Then I just began to feel gratitude and appreciation for my beautiful Margie and how she blesses my life in each of the five senses. (and some senses I can neither explain, or would be fit to mention here) I also admired all those brave souls I mentioned above and those that I did not mention who have not only overcome the physical challenges life has gave them, but went on to excel in areas that would seem impossible. It was not only inspiring, but motivating. If Helen Keller can become a best-selling author without having the use of her vision, why can’t I, who has fairly good vision do great things as well. If Beethoven did not let his deafness stop him from transforming the world of music, what excuse do we have for giving in to our limitations?